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Wat Chedi-Liem

History Wat Chedi-Liem is formerly known as ‘Wat Ku Kham’. Historical evidence indicates that the original temple name “Ku-Kham”, which literally means the golden stupa, is derived from the most significant structure within the temple, the main stupa. Chedi-liem or Ku Kham, the main stupa of the temple, was established in 1288 AD under the order of King Mhangrai, the first ruler of the Lanna Kingdom. The architectural structure of Chedi-Liem evidently demonstrates the influence of Haripunchai culture, as the construction resemble the square-based pyramidal stupa located at Wat Jamathewi in Lamphun, known as Ku Kud (literally means the missing finial stupa). However, the outer decoration including the Buddha images in the niches clearly indicates the influence of...
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Wat Chang Kham

History It is believed that Wat Chang Kham is the renowned temple ‘Wat Kan-Thom’, which has been repeatedly referred to in the ancient chronicles and oral histories. According to the chronicles, Wat Kan-Thom was built in the reign of King Mhangrai when Wiang Kum Kam still functioned as the capital city of Lanna. He commanded a craftsman called ‘Kan-Thom’ in his Royal Court to import wood from Chiang Saen, another city-state in the Kok river basin, and build a wooden viharn at the so-called Wat Kan-Thom.

As a few inscriptions with the name ‘Kan-Thom’ were recovered at Wat Chang Kham , it has been speculated that Wat Chang Kham might be formerly known as ‘Wat Kan-Thom’. However, it is also possible that such inscriptions were brought...
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Wat That Khao

History There is no historical document accounting for the time when the temple was built but it can be assumed that it was built during Wiang Kum Kam period. The temple was called "Wat That Khao" due to the plastered Chedi.

Location Wat That Khao is located south of Wat Chediliem in the western part of Wiang Kum Kam. The temple has recently been deserted and surrounded by longan gardens. The temple has been registered as deserted temple by the Department of Religious Affairs.

Construction Plan and Architecture The temple faces east. The excavated monuments included the Chedi at the back of the Vihara, small Viharas and Ubosot, which also face east. Only the base of the plastered masonry Chedi survived until today.

The excavation that was held in...
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Wat Pu Pia

History There is no historical evidence that accounts for the history of Wat Pu Pia. However, it is speculated that the temple was built during the time that Wiang Kum Kam remained the capital of Lanna (1,286-1,295 A.D.) and also during the early period before the loss of independence to the ancient Burmese Kingdom. The significance of Wat Pu Pia to Wiang Kum Kam is its components are in the almost complete condition allowing archaeologists and historians to make full use of tangible evidence and enabling visitors to enjoy the beauty of the structures.

The name ‘Pu Pia’ is expected to be derived from the name of the landowner who might own the right over the land during the resettlement after the abandonment of Wiang Kum Kam and the great flood.

Location Wat...
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Wat E-Khang

History There is no historical evidence that accounts for the origin of Wat E-Khang. However, an enormous scale of constructions, including both viharn (main hall) and the main stupa suggests that it must be one of the most important temples of the city. Considering its location, which is in the heart of Wiang Kum Kam, it is possible that Wat E-Khang might be the great ‘reliquary’ of the city built in accordance with the traditional Buddhist beliefs. The name ‘E-Khang’, which literally means ‘leaf monkey’, is given to this temple as they are dwellers that occupy this forested area for a while.

Location Wat E-Khang is located 250 metres away to the east from Wat Pu Pia. The temple is registered ‘deserted’ by the Department of Religious...
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Wat Nan Chang

History The name ‘Nan Chang’ was recently given to the temple in 2003 in honour of the landowner. It was also known as ‘Wat Ping Hang’ (literally means River Ping is drifting away) as the old course of River Ping is in vicinity. Before the excavation, this area was full of small mounds and clusters of ruins. The excavation reveals an enormous group of historical remains lying 2 metres below the ground level.

Despite the lack of evidence that accounts for the origin of Wat Nan Chang, the immense numbers of components found onsite clearly indicate that the temple might be a place of great importance and was possibly built when Wiang Kum Kam reached its peak in the sixteenth century. Ancient remains and artifacts recovered during the excavation reveal that...
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